Red dots can revolutionize your accuracy if used right. Travis takes a look at two popular Shield red dots in his latest review.

I love red dots on handguns. I've become a complete convert to the idea that mini red dots rule. Red dots have a place on every gun, well, at least the single stack 9mm world and up. Anything smaller than that, and things get tricky. When we start looking at smaller guns, there has been one dominant force in the small gun red dot market. The Shield footprint, specifically the RMSc footprint, has dominated the world of red dots for a number of years, and I've got my hands on their two premier red dots, the RSMc and RMSx.

These two dots share the same compact footprint, making them perfectly suited for your SIG P365, your Hellcat, your Glock 43X and 48 MOS, and basically every other micro compact on the market. These two dots do things differently, but they are both designed for small guns. They share the same footprint and share a number of features.

Inside the Shield Series of Red Dots

This includes automatic brightness adjustment, which works wonderfully, even under the hot and bright gaze of a weapon light. They lack buttons and don't turn off. Both the Shield RMSc and RMSx last for two to three years of battery use, and both optics provide some unbeatable clarity. These are the clearest optics I've ever put on a handgun.

The reticles are bright and clear, both red and some of the crisper dots on the market. You can choose between a 4 MOA or 8 MOA dot. Both are very easy to use, and I prefer the 4 MOA, but the 8 MOA would most certainly be an eye-catching design.

Getting on target and quickly and efficiently won't be an issue. The dots make it easy to see your target and to quickly engage the target. Why align your sights when you can just put a red dot on the target and pull the trigger? It eliminated issues with sight alignment and sight alignment.

When shopping for handgun red dots, both are excellent choices, but there are a few differences worth noting.

The Shield RMSc

The original micro-sized and micro footprint optic that started it all. The Shield RMSc utilizes a fascinating design. It's specifically designed to be as small as possible and to fit on the smallest of guns. Therefore it's light, small, and fits easily on tiny guns. The Shield RMSc became quite popular, and users can now choose between polymer lenses and a glass lens, the glass lens being the superior choice.

The Shield RMSc is one of the lightest and smallest optics on the market. The RMSc weighs a mere .57 ounces, so it doesn't weigh down your carry gun. It's less than an inch wide and less than an inch tall, and is only 1.7 inches long. This Shield optic minimizes size and keeps things teeny tiny.

The smaller the optic, the easier it is to conceal your weapon. Keeping things small and light makes things easy when it comes to concealment. Not too many people want to make their guns larger when it comes time to keep things concealed.

The Shield RMSx

On the flip side, the Shield RMSx offers a slightly bigger optic. In terms of its overall size, there are some differences. The window is massive. According to Shield, it's 80% bigger than the RMSc design. The RMSx features a huge window and therefore is a bigger optic. This makes your gun a little bigger and a little more difficult to conceal.

The RMSx is 1.7 inches long but 1.4 inches wide and .9 inches tall. It's a fair bit bigger, but you get lots and lots of window. The RMSx weighs .617 ounces, so while slightly heavier, it's still not a boat anchor. The larger window can be quite nice and very convenient.

A larger window is more forgiving and makes finding the dot easier and makes tracking the dot easier. It's a bit of a crutch, but it can be very handy. I find the big window to be easier to use when I'm stuck in bad situations. For example, when stuck shooting with a single hand, the bigger window is more forgivable and easier to use. A big window goes a lot way and can be quite handy to have if you don't mind the extra size.

Which Do You Want?

Well, you tell me! I've and enjoy both. Admittedly my carry gun features the larger RMSx. I love the big window, but I would carry it with the RMSc in a heartbeat. Let us know below which one you think is better.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
medical gear, med kit, SIG P365, air gun, Accomplice Mag Carrier, concealed carrier, concealed carry, responsibly armed, home security, home defense, weapon-mounted light, Streamlight, tlr-7, Streamlight tlr-7, self-defense, lds, light defender series, home defense firearms, tlr-1, tlr-6, Streamlight products

Travis Pike is a former Marine Machine gunner who served with 2nd Bn 2nd Marines for 5 years. He deployed in 2009 to Afghanistan and again in 2011 with the 22nd MEU(SOC) during a record-setting 11 months at sea. Travis has trained with the Romanian Army, the Spanish Marines, the Emirate Marines, and the Afghan National Army.

He serves as an NRA-certified pistol instructor and pursues a variety of firearms-based hobbies.

 

 

 


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