It’s hard to believe the SIG Sauer P365 premiered over a year ago. The little SIG made a huge splash by introducing the world to an ultra-small gun, nearly pocket pistol size that just so happened to be capable of holding ten to twelve rounds total. This gun was the size of most single stacks 9mms and nearly doubled their capacity. I predicted that the world of concealed carry guns had changed, and companies would scramble to be as equally innovative. At SHOT 2019, we saw Glock play their hand and introduce the Glock 48. This leads us to one major question, who wins in a P365 Vs Glock 48 showdown?

A Tale as Old as Time

The SIG P365 is a fantastic gun, and so is the Glock 48. By in large Glock owns most of the marketplace when it comes to handguns of all kinds. Polymer 80 guns even allow you to make a Glock Ghost gun. SIG is likely a close second who has picked up steam since winning the Military’s contract for a new handgun. Both companies are quite dynamic, and they produce some of the best handguns on the market.

I own a P365 and I’ve gotten in a lot of range time with a Glock 48 and before we kick this P365 vs Glock 48 showdown off I will say both are well-made weapons. Both are reliable and will serve you well in a concealed carry role. Without further handshaking and high fives let’s talk about the guns.

Specs

Both guns are 9mm semi-automatics. The Glock has an attractive nPVD finish and the SIG has a black Nitron finish. Both guns come with 10 round magazines, and the SIG P365 does have the option for a factory 12 round magazine. The guns are compact and lightweight, the SIG weighs 17.8 ounces and the Glock 48 weighs 20.74 ounces.

The SIG has a shorter 3.1-inch barrel and the Glock 48 has a 4.17-inch barrel. Clearly, that extra weight from the Glock is in that extra barrel length. The Glock 48 is also 5.03 inches tall and the P365 is 4.3 inches tall. What’s interesting is the fact the SIG P365 has a 4.9-inch sight radius and the Glock 48 has a slightly longer 5.09-inch sight radius.

Sight radius is critical to accurate shooting and small guns have a short sight radius. While Glock has a longer sight radius, it also has a substantially longer barrel. SIG did everything they could to increase the sight radius. They push the sights all the way to the rear to give as much as possible.

I’m much more impressed with the SIG’s sight radius, as well as their overall specs when it comes to a concealed carry gun. It is much smaller overall. The Glock’s increased grip length does make this an easier to draw and shoot gun. The Glock 48’s barrel is also slightly longer than the Glock 19 and believe it or not, this makes the gun legal in Canada. Specs in this P365 vs Glock 48 contest will ultimately be more important on an individual level.

Sights

The Glock comes with standard Glock plastic ‘target’ sights. I’ve never been impressed by these sights and most Glock owners tend to agree. Glock sight replacement is nearly mandatory, or least it’s a solid first upgrade.

SIG included the impressive XRAY night and day sights with the P365. These sights glow very brightly in low light situations. The day portion is the front sight. It has a bright green piece of polymer wrapped around the tritium vial. This bright green front sight is easy to pick up and quick on target. These sights are also made of metal.

While guns present perfectly usable sights the SIG P365 sights are vastly superior. SIG gets this one in our SIG Vs Glock 48 rumble.

Ergonomics

Another largely subjective class, one that makes the guns harder to compare. Both lack a manual safety, although SIG will have a thumb safety model soon. Both guns have solid triggers that are short pulls and break cleanly. The SIG has a slightly smoother trigger, but Glock has a better reset.

The SIG has a shorter grip that just barely fits my hand. The Glock 48’s longer grip is more comfortable to me. I have big hands and they don’t feel crowded on the G48’s grip. The magazine release is also bigger and more accessible on the G48. Both the SIG and G48 have reversible magazine releases.

Reloads with the G48 are easier, too. On the P365, my big hands often prevent the magazine from dropping free. This is not an issue with the G48. The Glock 48 is a little stronger in this round of our P365 Vs Glock 48 battle.

Comfort and Reliability

This is a solid tie. Both guns are incredibly reliable and eat whatever you put through them with relative ease. The guns are reliable with both FMJs and hollow points as well as aluminum, brass, and steel cased ammo. These guns can eat it all.

Comfort-wise as small 9mm handguns they have a little snap to them. Just a hair. Both are easy to control and painless when it comes to training and shooting. Neither will tire you out or leave you sore from shooting into high round counts. Both guns are well representative of their brands.

Price

Oh, how often a decision can come down to just the price of the gun. I ignored MSRPS and went and looked at real-world prices. SIG is selling for $499.99 at most outlets and the Glock 48 seems to be selling for right around $449.99. The SIG does come with night sights, and that’s personally worth 50 bucks to me.

Outside of just the gun’s prices, the magazines for the Glock 48 are also much cheaper. I’ve seen them for right around 20 bucks. P365 magazines are in the 40 to 50-dollar range. The Glock 48 is the cheaper gun overall and that’s a big factor for some people when doing their own SIG p365 vs Glock 48 comparisons.

My Choice?

SIG P365. Its smaller size makes it easier to conceal, I love the sights, and like the fact that I can pocket carry it. I also like that it has a rail and am able to add a Streamlight TLR-6 to the system for everyday use.

Which firearm would you choose? 

About the Author:

Travis Pike is a former Marine Machine gunner who served with 2nd Bn 2nd Marines for 5 years. He deployed in 2009 to Afghanistan and again in 2011 with the 22nd MEU(SOC) during a record-setting 11 months at sea. Travis has trained with the Romanian Army, the Spanish Marines, the Emirate Marines, and the Afghan National Army.

He serves as an NRA certified pistol instructor and pursues a variety of firearms based hobbies.